10/14/2005

Daily Kos: The Politicization of Crime

Tom DeLay said his opponents' only agenda "is the politics of personal destruction," to which he added, "and the criminalization of politics.".. Kossack Michael muses:"Is it just me? It's the not criminalization of politics that's the problem. It seems instead, we need to stop the politicization of crime" -- law

The Politicization of Crime
by Michael Alton Gottlieb
Tue Oct 11, 2005 at 05:51:14 PM CDT

There is a new audacious meme floating out of the mouths of neo-cons lately; notably Bill Kristol, who on FOX News said:

"I hate the criminalization of politics."

Tom DeLay said it too; right after his indictment:

DeLay has denied any wrongdoing and in an April letter to supporters borrowed a phrase coined by a long-ago besieged President Clinton, arguing his opponents' only agenda "is the politics of personal destruction," to which he added, "and the criminalization of politics."

And now I hear that Big Dick Cheney's Halliburton options have increased in value by 3,281% in the last year.

Hmmm. Is it just me? It's the not criminalization of politics that's the problem. It seems instead, we need to stop the politicization of crime.

But, getting rid of the criminals in politics is a pretty hard thing to do with the culture of corruption and cronyism that permeates the halls of a Republican Congress like a thick fog of an exploding patchouli bomb.

Didn't I read recently the chairman of the House Ethics Committee, Doc Hastings, has refused to investigate Tom Delay and others? Hmm, where was that? Oh, yeah.

Mr. DeLay now faces criminal charges in Texas for allegedly violating campaign laws, but taxpayers should still not expect much of a stir by the House's moral arbiters. The new committee chairman, Doc Hastings, a Republican from Washington State, made that clear last week when he stoutly defended the innocence of Mr. DeLay, his political mentor, while insisting that the House ethics committee would continue to shy from its own inquiry. "We don't have the resources," Mr. Hastings told The Yakima Herald-Republic, even though the committee received a 40 percent budget increase this year.

Hmmm. No resources. Hmmm, well, maybe they could borrow a few bucks from Dick Cheney.

It seems like calling the corruption and cronyism of Republican criminals in politicians clothing a Culture is almost an understatement. It's beyond culture apparently permeating the GOP DNA itself. Every day you pick up a paper or turn on the tube and witness a new outrage of crime perpetrated by Republican grifters in three piece suits. It's enough to shake your faith in good government.

Now, to be honest, because of the sad, jaded system of electoral politics we have in this country that requires a literal fortune for electoral competitiveness, I imagine some Democrats have done things they may not be proud of. But it seems the weight of overt crime is so overwhelmingly Republican that, holy crap; no wonder Democrats are the minority party. They just aren't as good criminals as Republicans.

Who was it that said, "Behind every great fortune there is a crime?" Oh yeah, Balzac.

Well no wonder criminals are drawn to politics. If you need a fortune to play the game and behind every fortune lay a crime then, poof, ipso facto, you've got criminals walking around pretending to be statesmen.

And now, these criminals have the unmitigated gall to defend themselves with cries of "politics." It's not politics. It's called breaking the law. Imagine; these guys write the laws and yet they're still breaking them. I suppose they think they are what Dostoyevsky called `extraordinary men' in a book called, ironically for this conversation; Crime and Punishment.

Daily Kos: The Politicization of Crime

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